They want to bring the Tasmanian tiger BACK TO LIFE! If this was a movie the scientists would be caught up in a sinister plot | First Dog on the Moon


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cheap method breaks down PFAS


A firefighter holds up a foam dispenser as it sprays out foam in front of a fire engine

Firefighting foams usually use per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFASs, which don’t break down within the surroundings.Credit score: FORGET Patrick/Alamy

Researchers have developed1 an method to interrupt down a category of long-lasting chemical substances that they are saying is simpler and cheaper than the tough strategies presently used. The work additionally hints at how these chemical substances, which have been linked to well being issues, crumble — a discovering that would assist to finally destroy these persistent pollution.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFASs, are broadly utilized in merchandise reminiscent of firefighting foams, waterproof garments and nonstick cookware. Dubbed ‘perpetually chemical substances’ as a result of they don’t break down below typical environmental circumstances, PFASs accumulate in soil and water and may persist within the human physique as soon as ingested. A 2015 examine2 discovered PFASs within the blood of 97% of Individuals, and scientists have linked them to circumstances together with thyroid illness, excessive ldl cholesterol and most cancers.

“The chemical substances had been initially designed by firms to be steady — that was a characteristic, however as soon as they get into the surroundings, it’s a flaw,” says Shira Joudan, an environmental chemist at York College in Toronto, Canada.

PFASs might be faraway from water, however disposing of those chemical substances has proved difficult. When buried in landfills, PFASs leach into the encircling surroundings, risking contamination of soil and groundwater.

Harsh therapies

Strategies to get rid of PFASs usually depend on costly and harsh therapies, a few of which require excessive pressures and temperatures above 1,000°C. What’s extra, there’s proof that incinerating merchandise containing PFASs can result in the unfold of those compounds into the surroundings, says Brittany Trang, an environmental chemist at Northwestern College in Evanston, Illinois, who co-led the examine describing the brand new method. “There’s a necessity for a technique to do away with PFASs in a means that doesn’t proceed to pollute,” she says.

The newest methodology, printed on 18 August Brittany Trangin Science, confirmed promise in breaking down one of many largest teams of PFASs utilizing cheap reagents and temperatures of about 100°C.

Joudan, who wasn’t concerned within the examine, says she’s excited in regards to the method. “That is the primary time I’ve seen a degradation mechanism the place I believed, ‘this might really make a distinction.’”

PFASs owe their sturdiness to a collection of carbon-fluorine bonds, that are amongst nature’s strongest chemical bonds. As an alternative of making an attempt to interrupt this steady bond, Trang and her colleagues focused a chemical group containing oxygen atoms at one finish of the molecule. By heating the compounds in a solvent referred to as DMSO and a standard reagent present in cleaners and soaps, the researchers efficiently knocked off the oxygen-containing group. This triggered a cascade of reactions that finally broke the compounds down into innocent merchandise.

Waste merchandise

Utilizing this method, the staff degraded 10 PFASs, together with PFOA — a chemical banned in most nations — and one among its frequent replacements.

Computational analyses urged that this class of PFASs falls aside two or three carbons at a time relatively than one carbon at a time, as typically assumed. Understanding the mechanisms by way of which these pollution break down may inform approaches to unravel the forever-chemicals drawback, Joudan says.

To this point, scientists have recognized greater than 12,000 PFASs. The newest degradation method works on PFOA and intently associated chemical substances, however not on one other well-liked class of PFASs often called perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, or PFOS — which is probably poisonous and not available on the market in lots of nations. Against this, present strategies can degrade PFOA and PFOS, says Ian Ross, who leads consulting on PFASs at Tetra Tech, a consulting and engineering firm headquartered in Pasadena, California.

Ross additionally notes that utilizing DMSO as a solvent in waste therapy may not be sensible, and he questions whether or not the method will discover real-world purposes. “It’s going to price you a fortune for those who’re going to purchase bulk portions of DMSO after which get rid of the DMSO — you may’t put it down a sewer,” he says.

The researchers hope that the examine will assist others develop their very own approaches to interrupt down PFASs. “Anybody engaged on PFASs degradation can take a look at this and perhaps have a greater understanding of what is perhaps occurring,” says co-author William Dichtel, who research PFASs removing at Northwestern College. “Regardless that I don’t faux that that is the ultimate resolution, it truly is why I do science — in order that I can have a optimistic affect on the world.”

Paraguay’s vice president to stay on after corruption accusations | Politics News

Hugo Velazquez reverses his determination to resign after the US final week accused him of involvement in ‘vital’ corruption.

The vice chairman of Paraguay has reversed a plan to resign this week, saying he won’t hand over his publish till he has particulars of america’s corruption claims in opposition to him.

Hugo Velazquez advised reporters on Thursday that he had initially provided to resign final week as he “assumed” there was a home investigation in opposition to him.

However on Wednesday, he acquired discover from the Paraguay prosecutor’s workplace stating “that there isn’t a case in opposition to me”, Velazquez stated.

“I had talked about once I spoke with you that I used to be going to resign from workplace … with a view to go and defend myself as a standard citizen,” Velazquez advised an area radio station.

“Yesterday afternoon I discovered that the Public Ministry determined to ask america Embassy for the details in regards to the criticism in opposition to me. Right this moment, I shouldn’t have a platform to defend myself as a result of there isn’t a investigation in america both,” he added.

Final Friday, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken stated a Velazquez affiliate had provided a bribe to a Paraguayan public official to “hinder an investigation that threatened the Vice President and his monetary pursuits”.

Blinken stated Velazquez can be barred from getting into the US as a result of his “involvement in vital corruption, together with bribery of a public official and interference in public processes”.

“Corrupt acts reminiscent of these additionally contribute to diminished confidence within the authorities and public perceptions of corruption and impunity throughout the workplace of the Paraguayan Vice President,” the highest US diplomat stated in a press release.

The accusation unleashed a political earthquake in Paraguay, the place Velazquez was set to be the federal government’s presidential candidate in main elections for the conservative Colorado Get together in December.

Velazquez, who has denied wrongdoing, however renounced his candidacy and stated he would go away the vice presidency this week.

However whereas the 54-year-old on Thursday stated he wouldn’t resign as vice chairman now, he additionally stated in a press release that his determination to not be a presidential candidate is “immovable”.

In July, the US additionally introduced a ban on former Paraguayan President Horacio Cartes, accusing the businessman-turned-politician of corruption and hyperlinks to “terrorist” teams.

Cartes’ political motion will face Velazquez’s within the primaries and the winner will likely be a candidate for the final elections scheduled for April 2023. Cartes’ candidate, former minister Santiago Pena, continues to be within the operating.

I have spent 25 years treating serious sexual offenders – this is what I’ve learned | Rebecca Myers


“I’ve obtained a listing of questions I’d wish to ask you about your sexual offending in opposition to kids, if that’s OK,” I say. “You may discover a few of them … ” I pause, unable to seek out the phrases, “ … a bit detailed and private.” The grizzled outdated man sitting in entrance of me nods, however doesn’t make eye contact. I don’t know who’s dreading the interview most, him or me.

This was the primary time I had been left alone, in a cell, in a maximum-security jail, with a person convicted of significant sexual offences. It could be removed from my final. I’ve spent the 25 years since that day within the mid-90s, once I was simply 22 years outdated and in possession of a shiny new psychology diploma, assessing, treating and researching males who commit sexual offences, together with sexual homicide.

I used to be drawn into forensic psychology as a result of, like most individuals, I discovered crime attention-grabbing. Basically, although, I needed to grasp why offenders behaved as they did; how they made choices that had such appalling, long-term penalties for his or her victims. And to determine precisely how they differed from the remainder of us.

I’ve discovered that males who commit sexual offences might be deceitful, manipulative, merciless, deluded, distorted and broken. But additionally, that they are often remorseful, ashamed, introspective, humorous, well mannered and keen to attempt to cease their dangerous behaviour. I’ve discovered that there’s often a mixture of identifiable underlying the reason why they commit their crimes, even when the offences seem to come back out of the blue. These can embody a backdrop of trauma and abuse (though not all the time), difficulties in relationships with others, distorted eager about ladies, kids and intercourse, unhelpful persona traits, poor problem-solving and coping abilities, and once more, typically however not all the time, an curiosity in, or a capability to be aroused by, sexual violence.

In my job, I’ve heard about probably the most disgusting and degrading issues that human beings do to at least one one other, and within the tiniest element – and it’s all the time powerful to listen to it, to learn the information and to take a look at the pictures. Often I’ve met a sufferer, which is without doubt one of the very hardest issues concerning the job.

Through the years I’ve discovered to attempt to go away the work on the jail gate once I go residence. I strategy every case as a puzzle to be solved, assimilating and analysing the knowledge to attempt to perceive what occurred. The cognitive process helps me to detach and to minimize my emotional response. I don’t eat once I learn information – it might make me really feel sick – and now that information are digital, I don’t have a look at them wherever else in the home however my workplace, to be able to hold a level of separation between the offences and my life.

Nonetheless, the offences inevitably spill over. As a lot as I think about myself hardened – as I feel most of us who work on this subject do – some crimes have an effect on me greater than others, for instance those who relate to the ages and genders of my very own kids. I even have the occasional flashback, or unhealthy dream, the place typically I’m the assassin myself and I’m reliving an offence.

Through the years I’ve turn into extra suspicious of individuals typically. I first noticed it in my early 20s when partaking with prisoners in intensive remedy; I turned cautious of males in bars, pals’ boyfriends, individuals on trains or buses at evening. I began to note strangers with kids – continuously on alert, like an overactive smoke alarm – for proof of kidnap or abuse in innocent conditions similar to in a park or grocery store. Once I had my very own kids, I turned hyper-vigilant and overprotective – shunning male babysitters, unable to let my kids go into public bathrooms on their very own, cautious of male sports activities coaches.

I’m conscious about my very own security. I worry strolling alone at midnight, and even alone within the day on a rustic path with my canines. Seeing a lone male within the countryside and not using a canine would trigger my senses to prickle. However I feel most ladies and susceptible individuals expertise these fears, significantly in darkish and remoted locations. I don’t know the way far more affected I’m as a result of I’ve labored with the perpetrators of significant sexual violence, however I do attempt to do all the correct issues to manage – peer supervision, counselling, train. Undoubtedly, “gallows” humour with colleagues is an efficient solution to decompress, too.

Regardless of all of this, I’ve stored doing the work as a result of I consider it’s vitally necessary to attempt to stop additional victims of significant sexual and violent offences. And the work is extraordinary and complicated, bringing mental problem, self-analysis, function, a way of feat and altruism, and an array of attention-grabbing, devoted colleagues into my life.

I additionally do it to assist the boys themselves. Nearly the entire offenders I’ve ever met don’t need to offend once more, and most sexual offenders don’t reoffend. They need to be helpful members of society. Nevertheless, launched sexual offenders face many limitations to this: stigma, ostracism, lack of labor, housing, pals, household, human connection. For the minority of intercourse offenders who do reoffend, it’s precisely some of these issues that make it extra doubtless that they could achieve this.

Males who’ve dedicated intercourse offences are launched every single day within the UK – we usually don’t lock individuals up and throw away the important thing. As tough because it may be, an openness to the likelihood that these sorts of offenders can change, and a conscious tolerance of them, would assist those that are to be launched reside safely in our society. That – and plenty of extra assets each in jail and locally to handle them. For my part, these items would contribute to decreasing the chance of additional victims – absolutely an important factor?

I by no means predicted that I’d uncover that the considering kinds of lots of the males I handled in jail weren’t that totally different from my very own. For instance, needing to be the primary or greatest at one thing or struggling to belief a accomplice in a relationship. Finally, I realised that beneath all of it, they have been merely human beings: individuals who had dedicated dreadful crimes, but who have been primarily simply individuals.

World Cup Countdown: Europe | Qatar World Cup 2022

From: World Cup Countdown

Can France win back-to-back World Cups? Will Ronaldo lastly get his arms on the trophy? The European perspective forward of the Center East’s first soccer World Cup.

Qatar 2022 kicks off on November 20 and the clock is ticking.

Al Jazeera’s month-to-month World Cup Countdown offers you a world perspective from each area forward of the Center East’s first-ever FIFA World Cup.

August’s episode focuses on Europe, with professional evaluation from 2010 World Cup winner Javi Martinez and former Scotland striker Andy Grey.

We hit all the important thing speaking factors as 13 European international locations purpose for fulfillment in Qatar.

When and where to protect forests


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    Hundreds of thousands of people that have had Covid-19 nonetheless face a better threat of neurological and psychiatric circumstances, together with mind fog, dementia and psychosis, two years after their sickness, in contrast with those that have had different respiratory infections, in keeping with the only largest research of its variety.

    Additionally they face an elevated threat of tension and melancholy, the analysis suggests, however this subsides inside two months of getting Covid-19. Over two years the chance is not any extra possible than after different respiratory infections. The findings are revealed within the Lancet Psychiatry journal.

    Nearly 600m Covid-19 instances have been recorded worldwide because the begin of the pandemic, and there was rising proof that individuals who survive the illness face elevated dangers of neurological and psychiatric circumstances.

    Earlier research have discovered that folks face larger dangers of a number of neurological and psychological well being circumstances within the first six months after an infection. Till now, nonetheless, there was no large-scale knowledge analyzing the dangers over an extended time interval. The brand new research, by the College of Oxford and the Nationwide Institute for Well being and Care Analysis Oxford Well being Biomedical Analysis Centre, analysed 1.28m Covid-19 instances over two years.

    Dr Max Taquet, who led the analyses on the College of Oxford, mentioned: “The findings shed new gentle on the longer-term psychological and mind well being penalties for folks following Covid-19 an infection. The outcomes have implications for sufferers and well being companies and spotlight the necessity for extra analysis to grasp why this occurs after Covid-19, and what might be executed to stop these problems from occurring, or deal with them after they do.”

    The research analysed knowledge on 14 neurological and psychiatric diagnoses from digital well being data principally from the US. It discovered that in adults the chance of melancholy or nervousness elevated after Covid-19 however returned to the identical as with different respiratory infections inside about two months.

    Nevertheless, the chance of another neurological and psychological well being circumstances remained larger after Covid-19 than for different respiratory infections on the finish of the two-year follow-up.

    Adults aged 64 and underneath who had Covid-19 had a better threat of mind fog (640 instances per 10,000 folks) in contrast with those that had different respiratory infections (550 instances per 10,000 folks).

    In these aged 65 and over who had Covid-19, there was a better prevalence of mind fog (1,540 instances per 10,000 folks), dementia (450 instances per 10,000 folks) and psychotic problems (85 instances per 10,000 folks) in contrast with those that beforehand had a unique respiratory an infection (1,230 instances per 10,000 for mind fog, 330 instances per 10,000 for dementia and 60 instances per 10,000 for psychotic dysfunction).

    Leads to kids confirmed similarities and variations to adults. The chance of most diagnoses after Covid-19 was decrease than in adults, they usually weren’t at better threat of tension or melancholy than kids who had different respiratory infections. Nevertheless, like adults, kids recovering from Covid-19 had been extra more likely to be recognized with some circumstances, together with seizures and psychotic problems.

    Extra neurological and psychiatric problems had been seen through the Delta variant wave than with the prior Alpha variant. The Omicron wave was linked with comparable neurological and psychiatric dangers as Delta.

    The researchers cautioned that there have been some essential limitations to think about. The research might underrepresent self-diagnosed and asymptomatic instances of Covid-19 as these are unlikely to be recorded. It additionally didn’t have a look at the severity or size of circumstances after Covid-19 and the way they evaluate with different respiratory infections.

    Prof Paul Harrison, who led the research on the College of Oxford, mentioned: “It’s excellent news that the surplus of melancholy and nervousness diagnoses after Covid-19 is short-lived, and that it isn’t noticed in kids. Nevertheless, it’s worrying that another problems, equivalent to dementia and seizures, proceed to be extra possible recognized after Covid-19, even two years later.”

    Should the West be nervous about Turkey’s close ties with Russia? | Politics

    From: Inside Story

    Ankara and Moscow are shoring up their cooperation as Russia faces isolation and sanctions.

    Russia and Turkey are reported to have agreed on the supply of a second batch of S-400 missiles.

    Turkey’s choice in 2017 to buy the Russian air defence system was an indication of a deepening pragmatic – but sophisticated – relationship between Presidents Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Vladimir Putin.

    Ankara continues to play what it calls a “balancing act” between Russia on one facet, and NATO on the opposite.

    However this doesn’t sit properly with western nations.

    They’ve threatened to impose sanctions if Turkey continues to assist Russia evade sanctions over its struggle on Ukraine.

    In order it wages struggle in Ukraine, how will Russia profit from the partnership?

    Presenter: Kim Vinnell

    Friends:

    Maximilian Hess – Fellow on the International Coverage Analysis Institute and an skilled in Eurasian affairs

    Liudmila Samarskaia – Specialist within the up to date historical past of the Center East and a analysis fellow on the Institute of World Financial system and Worldwide Relations

    Sinan Ulgen – Former Turkish diplomat and director of Edam, a think-tank that focuses on Turkey’s international, safety, financial and digital coverage

    Floating perovskite-BiVO4 devices for scalable solar fuel production


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  • How has a year of Taliban rule changed Afghanistan? | TV Shows

    On Wednesday, August 17 at 19:30 GMT:
    It’s now a yr because the Taliban took management of Afghanistan’s capital Kabul, hastening the exit of all US troops from the nation.

    Taliban leaders say that within the months since they swept to energy, individuals throughout Afghanistan reside so as and safety, whereas urging that the “the world mustn’t count on us to attain all our targets in a single day”.

    However many Afghans say their lives have deteriorated in the previous couple of months. Girls and women have confronted more and more repressive Taliban-imposed restrictions on their motion, costume, employment and entry to training – with the Taliban swiftly shutting down protests for girls’s rights. Hazaras and different ethnic spiritual minority teams have borne the brunt of lethal assaults by teams akin to Islamic State Khorasan Province (ISKP), a serious rival to the Taliban. And journalists have confronted arbitrary arrest and abuse by Taliban authorities whereas making an attempt to do their job.

    The nation can also be mired in an financial disaster. Worldwide funding to Afghanistan was turned off quickly after the Taliban swept to energy on August 15, 2021. In current months,  thousands and thousands of individuals have been plunged into debt, with an estimated 70 p.c of households struggling to get the naked necessities. A chronic drought is exacerbating starvation.

    But as Afghanistan’s financial issues mount, it stays unable to entry billions of {dollars} of central financial institution reserves held overseas, principally in the USA. A gaggle of Afghan and worldwide NGOs has urged that these funds be unfrozen at once to assist carry aid to Afghans enduring hardship, however main variations persist between the US and Taliban officers over the circumstances underneath which the cash can be launched.

    On this episode of The Stream we’ll replicate on the dramatic rise to energy of the Taliban on August 15 2021, and take a look at how individuals’s each day lives have modified underneath its rule.

    On this episode of The Stream, we’re joined by:
    Suhail Shaheen, @suhailshaheen1
    Head of Taliban’s Political Workplace in Doha, and Everlasting Consultant of Afghanistan to the United Nations

    Pashtana Durrani, @barakpashtana
    Government Director, LEARN Afghanistan

    Ali Latifi, @alibomaye
    Journalist, Al Jazeera